View from Tower at Erieview

View from Tower at Erieview

One Cleveland Center - 1983
The Stubbins Associates
31 Floors
450 ft/137m
1375 East Ninth St., Cleveland

One Cleveland Center is Cleveland's fifth tallest building. It is notable for its angular shape as most of the surrounding buildings are in the more formal International Style. Another unusual aspect is the building's angular site placement, a rarity given downtown Cleveland's "grid" street pattern. The Stubbins Associates also designed the Citicorp Center in New York City.


VIEW FROM THE HILTON HOTEL

VIEW FROM THE HILTON HOTEL

Fifth Third Center - 1992
RTKL Associates
28 Floors
446 feet/136m
600 Superior Ave., Cleveland

This building, constructed as the Bank One Center, features a distinctive green hipped roof and twin-spired antennae. The tower was renamed in 2003 when Fifth Third Bank of Cincinnati relocated its Cleveland area operations to the structure. Fifth Third Bank signage was added in spring of 2004. The site was formerly the home to the Hollenden Hotel.


View from Superior Viaduct

View from Superior Viaduct

Federal Court House Tower - 2002
Kallman, McKinnell & Wood/General Services Administration
24 Floors
430 ft/131m
801 Superior Avenue West

This tower is currently the tallest in the western central business district, with the name “Court House” chosen in homage to the old Federal Building which formerly housed the operations now located in this tower. The building features a distinctive cornice which was illuminated at night for several years. Another notable feature is an enclosed walkway which connects the tower to Tower City Center. A sculpture by artist Jim Dine highlights the entrance on Huron Road.


View from AECOM CENTER

View from AECOM CENTER

Justice Center - 1976
Prindle, Patrick and Partners
26 Floors
420 ft/128m
1300 Ontario St., Cleveland

The Justice Center is the downtown headquarters of the Cleveland Police Department. The complex features this tower which houses numerous courtrooms. Also located at the complex is “Portal”, a large sculpture by noted artist Isamu Noguchi and other public art installations.


View from Lakeside Avenue at East Sixth Street

View from Lakeside Avenue at East Sixth Street

Anthony J. Celebreeze Federal Building- 1967
Outcalt, Guenther, Rode and Bonebrake
32 Floors
419 ft/128m
1240 East Ninth St., Cleveland

This building houses numerous government agency offices. One of the original designs for this building was an eight-story structure with central courtyard that occupied most of the site. The building is currently undergoing a facade replacement and subsequent encasement which will enhance the building's energy efficiency and operations.


View from Cleveland Trust Tower

View from Cleveland Trust Tower

PNC Center - 1980
Skidmore, Owings and Merrill
35 Floors
410 ft/125m
1900 East Ninth St., Cleveland

This tower was built as the headquarters for the National City Bank Corporation and replaced the Bond department store.


View from East Ninth Street and Euclid Avenue.

View from East Ninth Street and Euclid Avenue.

Metropolitan at the 9 (Cleveland Trust Tower) - 1971
Marcel Breuer and Hamilton Smith
29 Floors
383 ft/117
2017 East Ninth Street, Cleveland

This building was constructed as the headquarters of the Cleveland Trust bank. This tower was originally designed with an adjacent twin tower (on the site of the 1010 Euclid Building), which was never built. With its black granite and exposed concrete window framing, the tower is a stark contrast to the Beaux-Arts styled Cleveland Trust Rotunda - the original headquarters for the Cleveland Trust bank designed by George B. Post.

Cleveland Trust later became Ameritrust Bank, which eventually merged with Society Bank (Society Bank is now part of KeyBank). After the bank mergers, the building was vacated and maintained for over a decade. At one time, the tower was to be demolished in a controversial and ill-conceived plan as the site for the new Cuyahoga County administration center. The plan was reworked, and the administration center was constructed adjacent to the tower at the corner of East Ninth Street and Prospect Avenue.

In 2013, redevelopment started of the tower, rotunda and adjacent 1010 Euclid Building into a mixed-use complex called "The 9" including hotel, residential and retail. The tower contains apartments and a hotel; the rotunda and 1010 Building is home to a Heinens grocery store.


View from Mall A

View from Mall A

Cleveland Hilton Convention Center - 2016
Cooper Carry
32 Floors
374 ft/114m
100 Lakeside Avenue East, Cleveland

This 600+ room hotel was completed in June 2016 at the site of the former Cuyahoga County administration building. The distinctive facade is angled to pay homage to the pathways on Mall B below. The cornice of the podium is 90 feet tall, also an homage to the surrounding buildings in the Group Plan of 1903. A notable feature is the publicly accessible 32nd floor bar and deck. It is the tallest all-hotel structure in Cleveland and in the State of Ohio. Click here to see earthcam views of the construction.


View from 200 Public Square

View from 200 Public Square

AT&T Huron Road Building (SBC/Ohio Bell) - 1927
Hubbell and Benes
24 Floors
365 ft/111m
750 Huron Road, Cleveland

The tallest Art Deco building in Cleveland, and reputedly the influence for the “Daily Planet” building in the Superman comic series (created by Cleveland natives Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster). This tower was briefly the tallest in Cleveland until the Terminal Tower was constructed.


View from Chester Avenue

View from Chester Avenue

Rhodes Tower (Cleveland State University) - 1971
Outcault and Guenther
23 Floors
363 ft/111m
2121 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland

This building is the second tallest building dedicated to education in the United States, as well as the tallest academic building in Ohio. The structure is named after former Ohio Governor James A. Rhodes.


View from 1717 East Ninth Street

View from 1717 East Ninth Street

1111 Superior (Eaton Center) - 1983
Skidmore, Owings and Merrill
28 Floors
356 ft/109m
1111 Superior Ave., Cleveland

This tower was the headquarters for the Eaton Corporation, and was one of Cleveland’s first skyscrapers with a reflective glass facade. The building's floorplates are essentially two chamfered intersecting squares, resulting in the tower's distinct shape.