View from Superior Avenue

View from Superior Avenue

The Leader Building - 1912
Charles Platt
15 Floors
199 ft/61m
526 Superior Avenue East, Cleveland

The Leader Building was constructed as the headquarters for a now-defunct newspaper. The building features an ornate lobby with entrances off East Sixth Street and Superior Avenue.

 
View from Euclid Avenue

View from Euclid Avenue

Cleveland Clinic - Crile Building
Cesar Pelli and Associates
15 Floors
198 ft/ 60m

2049 East 100th Street, Cleveland
This ziggurat shaped tower won an award from the Cleveland chapter of the American Institute of Architects upon its completion. The building houses multiple departments for the Cleveland Clinic's operations.

 
View from the Society for Savings building

View from the Society for Savings building

Higbee Building - 1931
Graham, Anderson, Probst and White
11 Floors
196 ft/60m
100 Public Square, Cleveland

This building was constructed as the flagship department store for the Higbee Company and is part of the Tower City Center complex. The Higbee Company occupied the building until 1984 when it was acquired by Dillards. The building is now home to the Horseshoe Cleveland casino, and has been featured prominently in several films, including 'A Christmas Story'.

 
View from the Cuyahoga River

View from the Cuyahoga River

Crittenden Court - 1996
Richard L. Bowen and Associates
18 Floors
195 ft/59m

955 W Saint Clair Ave, Cleveland
This building was the first residential high-rise in the Flats. A three-story addition was completed in 2004, featuring a metal spire at the building's northwest corner.

 
View from Euclid Avenue

View from Euclid Avenue

Statler Arms - 1912
George B. Post
14 Floors
192 ft/58m
1127 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland

The building was originally constructed as the Statler Hotel and at one time contained over 1,000 guest rooms. The building also served as an office complex for several years.  In 2001 the building was renovated and converted into residential use as 295 apartments. The complex includes a conference center as well as seven penthouse apartments on the top floor.

 
View from Superior Avenue

View from Superior Avenue

75 Public Square - 1915
Hubbell and Benes
15 Floors
187 ft/ 57m
75 Public Square, Cleveland

This building was constructed as the original headquarters for the Illuminating Company. It features a brick exterior and a decorative terracotta cornice.

 
View from Euclid Avenue

View from Euclid Avenue

City Club Building - 1903
Hubbell and Benes
14 Floors
184 ft/56m
850 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland

This building was constructed as the Citizens Building and is home to the City Club, one of the country's oldest public speech forums. The building originally featured a Greek Revival-styled entrance.

 
View from Lake Erie

View from Lake Erie

Pinnacle Condominiums - 2006
Schmidt Copeland Parker Stevens
14 Floors
181 ft/55m
701 Lakeside Avenue, Cleveland

This building was constructed atop an existing three-story parking garage. Its glassy modern facade is a striking contrast to surrounding buildings in the Historic Warehouse District.

 
View from Tower at Erieview

View from Tower at Erieview

IMG Center - 1965
Schafer, Flynn and Associates
15 Floors
180 ft/55m
1360 East Ninth Street, Cleveland

This building was constructed as One Erieview Plaza and became the headquarters for Cuyahoga Savings bank. The site is part of the I.M. Pei-designed Erieview urban renewal plan.  The building was renamed the IMG Center when the IMG talent agency relocated there.

 
View of restoration work from Euclid Avenue

View of restoration work from Euclid Avenue

Euclid and Ninth Tower - 1902
Levi Scofield
14 Floors
178 ft/54m
2000 East Ninth Street, Cleveland

This building was originally named the Schofield Building, after Levi Schofield who designed Public Square's Soldiers and Sailors' monument. At one point, the original facade was covered and a clocktower/cupola feature was removed. The building was also known as the Trans Ohio building when the Trans Ohio financial corporation occupied it.  In 2013, redevelopment into hotel/residential use commenced and the building's original facade will be restored.

 
View from Euclid Avenue and East Ninth Street

View from Euclid Avenue and East Ninth Street

1010 Euclid (Swetland Building) - 1910
Searles, Hirsh and Gavin
13 Floors
175 ft/53m
1010 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland

This building was scheduled for demolition on two occasions - in 1971 to make way for an addition to the Marcel Breuer-designed Cleveland Trust Tower, and again in 2006 when the then-Cuyahoga County commissioners planned to build a new headquarters on the site. Neither plan came to fruition and in 2014 the building was redeveloped into a residential component of "The 9", a mixed-use development that also includes the Cleveland Trust Tower and the landmark Cleveland Trust Rotunda. A notable feature of the building's restoration involved the reconstruction of the decorative cornice which had been removed decades ago.

 
View from EAst ninth and Prospect Avenue

View from EAst ninth and Prospect Avenue

The Rose Building - 1902
George H. Smith
10 Floors
165 ft/50m
2060 East Ninth Street, Cleveland

At the time of its construction, this building was the largest office building in Ohio and considered to be on the "fringe" of Cleveland's central business district. It was developed by Benjamin Rose, a notable innovator in the refrigerated meatpacking and shipping industries. The building is home to Medical Mutual of Ohio, a health and life insurance company.

 
View from Superior Avenue at East Third Street

View from Superior Avenue at East Third Street

Louis Stokes Wing (Cleveland Public Library) - 1998
Hardy, Holzman, Pfeiffer Associates
10 Floors
163 ft/50m
525 Superior Avenue, Cleveland

Built on the site of the former headquarters of the Cleveland Plain Dealer newspaper, this building added much-needed space to the Cleveland Public Library's downtown facilities. The four stone-clad turrets at each corner reference the roof lines of the adjacent buildings in the 1903 Group Plan configuration. The building is separated from the original facilities by the Eastman Reading Garden featuring a Maya Lin-designed fountain.

 

View from Quarry Lane

View from Quarry Lane

Crown Centre - 1990
Kaczmar Architects
13 Floors
(Crown Centre I); 8 Floors (Crown Centre II)
160 ft/49m (Crown Centre I)
5005 Rockside Road, Independence

Crown Centre I and II are located in suburban Independence, south of Cleveland. The pyramidal tops of the towers are illuminated with green neon at night.

 

Society for Savings - 1889
Burnham and Root
10 Floors
152 ft/46m

127 Public Square
This building is one of the oldest on Public Square and considered to be Cleveland's first "skyscraper". In 1991, the building was incorporated into the design and construction of Key Tower. A light court was filled in with office floors, however the banking lobby's stained glass ceiling was preserved and is artificially illuminated. This building also features a decorative lamp on its southwest corner, representative of the first electrically illuminated streetlight.

 
VIew from East 4th Street

VIew from East 4th Street

The Arcade (Hyatt Regency)- 1890
John Eisenmann and George H. Smith
10 Floors (each tower)
149 ft/45m
401 Euclid Avenue

The Arcade was built in 1890 and designed by John Eisenmann and George H. Smith. The construction was financed by John D. Rockefeller, Marcus Hanna and several other wealthy Clevelanders of the day with a cost of $875,000. The inspiration of the project is said to be the Vittorio Emanuele in Milan, Italy. Although pedestrian arcades exist in several North American cities, few - if any, compare to the grandeur of the Arcade in Cleveland. In 1973, the Arcade was the first building in Cleveland to be placed on the National Register of Historic Places. The structure includes the famous skylight-capped atrium as well as two 9-story towers, one each on Euclid Avenue and Superior Avenue. The top floor features gargoyles which circle the entire atrium area.  In 1940, the Arcade underwent renovation which included two major changes - the Euclid Avenue facade and the Superior Avenue staircase. Both were redesigned in an Art Deco fashion which was a popular style of the period. The Euclid Avenue facade was altered to include two sculpted "medallions" of Charles Brush and Stephen Harkness, former presidents of the Cleveland Arcade Company. The Superior Avenue staircase was redesigned to accommodate a small retail space.

By the 1970s, the Arcade had suffered along with the decline of Euclid Avenue and downtown Cleveland. Although it never lost its opulence, the retail tenants felt the effects of much of Cleveland's population fleeing to the suburbs (and taking business with them). The Arcade was actually threatened with demolition as some myopic developers had plans to erect a 20-story office tower. Fortunately, sensible minds prevailed and the Arcade was maintained for several decades until it was redeveloped once again. In 2001, The Hyatt corporation redeveloped the Arcade into Cleveland's first Hyatt Regency hotel. The Hyatt Regency occupies the two towers and the top three floors of the atrium area. The two lower floors of the atrium area remain open to the public with retail spaces and a food court. In addition, the Hyatt's lobby and offices are located near the Superior Avenue entrance.

 
View from East Ninth Street and Prospect Avenue

View from East Ninth Street and Prospect Avenue

Huron Square Apartments - 1923
11 Floors
132 ft/40m
1001 Huron Road, Cleveland

Originally built as the Medical Center Building, this building features extensive decoration on its lower and upper floors. The building has been restored and converted to a 70-unit apartment building.

 

Sydell and Arnold Miller Family Pavilion- 2008
10 Floors
130 ft/40m
9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland

This 10-story tower was completed in November 2008 and is home to the Heart and Vascular Institute of the Cleveland Clinic.