Architects rendering - view from Public Square

Architects rendering - view from Public Square

Ameritrust Center - 1991
Status: Cancelled
KPF
60 Floors
1,198 ft/365m
West Roadway at Public Square, Cleveland

This tower was slated to be built adjacent to the northwest quadrant of Public Square. At over 60 stories, the tower would have been Cleveland's tallest at a height of approximately 1,198 feet. A Hyatt hotel was planned to occupy the lower floors of the structure. Two historic mid-rise buildings were demolished to make way for this tower. The Ameritrust Center was cancelled when Society Bank (now KeyBank) acquired Ameritrust Bank at the time Society Center (Key Tower) was under construction - Society Bank had no need for additional office space. The site has remained a parking lot ever since.


Model of building, courtesy of Gehry Partners, LLP

Model of building, courtesy of Gehry Partners, LLP

Progressive Corporation, Corporate Headquarters (Cancelled)
Status: Cancelled
Gehry Partners, LLP

850 feet/259 meters (approximate)
Lakeside Avenue, Cleveland

The image of the building model and project description have been generously contributed by Gehry Partners, LLP. Special thanks to Jennifer Frutchy, Peter B. Lewis, Keith Mendenhall, and Laura Stella.

Occupying a site as the northern end of Cleveland's historic Burnham Mall, the corporate headquarters building would have been erected withinthe space provided by air rights over the existing railroad tracks, separating the Mall from Lake Erie.  The master plan called for the end of the Burnham Mall to be flanked by the Progressive Corporation tower and a high rise hotel, creating a gateway to the city and mirroring the positioning of City Hall and the County building.  The project would have brought together under one roof the majority of Progressive Corporation, an innovative and rapidly expanding insurance company currently housed in a number of buildings throughout the suburbs.  In addition to the one million square feet of office space in the high rise configuration, the project would have included an art museum, a creativity center, a health club and a research center.
 
The visual mass of the office tower was broken down into two contiguous vertical elements clad with metal and stone, respectively.  Executive and mechanical penthouses, and a restaurant were articulated at the top of the building by changes in both form and material.  The art museum, with its scholars' library and auditorium, was to be located to one side of the health club, training center and cafeteria were to inhabit a structure separated from the tower to preserve views from City Hall to the Lake.
 
The 100-foot walkway from the Mall to the Lakefront was to be designed by Donald Judd.  Richard Serra was to craft a sculpture on the deck of the parking garage, the first installation of a proposed art park.  Claes Oldenberg's carpenter's C-Clamp sculpture was to appear to hold down a part of the health club and an oversized newspaper perched atop the tower was to create an unusual sky landmark.

CLIENT: Progressive Insurance Company
AREA: 1,000,000 sq. ft. (approximately)
SCHEDULE: Begin Design: 1987
COSTS: N/A
PROJECT TEAM: Frank O. Gehry - Design Principal;David Denton - Project Principal; Bruce Biesman-Simons - Project Architect; C. Gregory Walsh - Project Designer; Eileen Yankowski - Project Team; Susan Narduli; Andrew Alper; CJ Bonura
ASSOCIATE ARCHITECT: van Dijk, Johnson & Partners
AWARDS: 1991 LA/AIA Honor Award

 
Rendering by NBBJ

Rendering by NBBJ

nuCLEus - announced 2015
Status: Proposed
NBBJ
54 Floors
647 ft/197m (residential tower component)
East 4th Street at Huron Road

This mixed-use proposal from developer Robert Stark would replace a parking lot and parking deck in the Gateway District. The main tower would be focused on residential use, with a hotel component in the "skybridge" and a shorter office building on the easternmost portion of the development site.


Rendering, view from Euclid Avenue at East Ninth Street

Rendering, view from Euclid Avenue at East Ninth Street

Cleveland Trust Tower, Phase II - 1971
Status: Cancelled
Marcel Breuer
28 Floors
383 ft/116m
Euclid Avenue at East Ninth Street, Cleveland

This tower was planned for the site east of the Cleveland Trust Rotunda, where the Swetland Building (1010 Euclid) currently stands. The tower was designed as a twin to the 28-story Cleveland Trust Tower constructed in 1971 fronting East 9th Street. 

 

The Beacon/515 Euclid
Status: Proposed
NADAAA
Planned height: 
338 feet
19 Stories constructed atop existing parking garage
515 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland

This proposal is slated as new construction atop an existing parking garage which was built in 2005 and completed to allow for additional floors to be added at a later date. An initial proposal for a residential tower by Richard Fleischman and Associates never came to fruition. The facade of the Beacon structure would be clad in metal panels which would give the tower a gradient effect of darker at street level and lighter toward the upper floors. Original plans for the existing garage included recladding to match the tower's facade. Construction is scheduled to commence in September, 2017.

 
Rendering from East 36th And Euclid Avenue

Rendering from East 36th And Euclid Avenue

Masonic Memorial Building - 1920s
Status: Cancelled
Approximately 24 Floors
Euclid Avenue at East 36th Street, Cleveland

This neo-classical tower was planned for the site on the northeast corner of Euclid Avenue and East 36th street, adjacent to the Masonic Auditorium. The tower would have stood approximately 24 stories.

 
ARCHITECT'S RENDERING

ARCHITECT'S RENDERING

Doubletree Hotel at Courthouse Square - 2003
Status: Cancelled
KA Architecture
27 Floors
350 Feet/107m
Lakeside Avenue at West Sixth Street, Cleveland

This $70 million mixed-use project, was to include a Doubletree Hotel, offices, and retail/restaurant space. The hotel was to have from 275-300 rooms. The lower six floors of the tower were designed in context with the surrounding buildings in the Warehouse District, and the plans included a 400-car parking garage. The site was eventually turned over to Cuyahoga County and remains a parking lot.

 
ARCHITECT'S RENDERING

ARCHITECT'S RENDERING

Public Square Tower - 2008
Status: Cancelled

Gensler
21 Floors
300 Feet/91m
Superior Avenue at West Roadway, Cleveland

This $180 million office tower was planned for the site where the unbuilt Ameritrust Center would have stood, flanking the northwest corner of Public Square. The tower never came to fruition due to a difficult commercial real estate market during the Great Recession.

 
Architect's REnDERING

Architect's REnDERING

One University Circle - projected completion 2017-2018
Status: Under construction

Dimit Architects
20 Floors
234 Feet/71m
Stearns Road at Euclid Avenue (University Circle)

This $112 million project broke ground in the spring of 2016. Upon completion, the building will house 280 residential units and will be one of the taller structures in the University Circle area. The building is being constructed on the site of the former Cleveland Children's Museum.

 
Building Model

Building Model

District Park Condominiums (Cancelled)
Status: Cancelled
Pappageorge/Haymes

10/12/15 Floors (Three Buildings)
135 ft./160 ft./208 ft.
West Ninth Street, Cleveland

This trio of residential towers was planned in 2004 for the West 9th Street corridor in the Historic Warehouse District. The project consisted of a 10-story (135 ft.) building fronting West 9th Street, a 12-story (168 ft.) building in the central portion of the site, and a 15+ story (208+ ft.) building fronting West 10th Street.
 

Building model

Building model

Cuyahoga County Administration Building (Cancelled)
Status: Cancelled
KPF

Approximately 12-14 floors
Approximately 170 feet
Euclid Avenue at East Ninth Street, Cleveland

In 2007, Cuyahoga County Commissioners voted to demolish the former Cleveland Trust Tower and 1010 Euclid (Swetland) to build a new county administration building. The new building was designed by Kohn, Pedersen and Fox and featured a glassy facade and a footprint that would have encompassed the historic Cleveland Trust Rotunda. The plans never materialized, and the ill-conceived scheme was one of several perpetrated in a long-standing pattern of corruption that eventually led to the imprisonment of several key players.